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Grow Your Writing Skills — Part I

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In an effort to grow my copywriting skills, I took Ian Lurie’s LinkedIn Learning course “Learning to Write Marketing Copy.” He broke copywriting down into four easy steps: create a plan, free write, write your first draft, and polish your writing. While the course focused specifically on writing marketing copy, I’ve been able to apply his method to fiction writing, blog writing, and even journalism.

This week, I’d like to focus on the first step.

Create a Plan

Have you ever taken a composition and rhetoric class? My first semester of college, I took English 101, which taught me how to research, outline, and write research papers. Throughout my education, I used that model (research, outline, write) for most of my papers and assignments, big and small.

The first step in any writing project is to research or create a plan. While I used a more structured outline for planning academic papers, I’ve found that bulleted lists do the trick for most copywriting and fiction writing projects.

Know Your Audience

Lurie suggests first jotting down notes about your audience. In my work as a copywriter for Liberty University Marketing, I primarily write to Generation Z high school students. Understanding my audience’s needs is important to every email, postcard, and booklet I write.

If, for example, I’m working on a direct mail advertisement, I start by making a list of things I know are important to Gen Z students:

  • Sustainability
  • Diversity and inclusion
  • Fiscal responsibility
  • Hands-on learning opportunities
Photo by Kaboompics from Pexels

And the list goes on. Once I have a list of Gen Z’s priorities, I can brainstorm ways our university can meet those needs. For example, I might write about Liberty’s energy-saving efforts and 40 percent recycling rate to address Gen Z’s interest in sustainability. 

Similarly, if you are writing fiction for children and young adults, it’s important to understand what’s important to them. In a session from Write2Ignite’s 2019 conference, author and presenter Edie Melson said that you need to be reading the current literature on the market. (i.e., If you want to write young adult fiction, you need to read young adult fiction.)

Reading young adult fiction or children’s books gives you an understanding of the types of stories that are popular, but it doesn’t tell you much about your audience. I suggest not only reading popular fiction for your target audience, but also researching your audience so you can understand what is important to them.

Make a List of Collateral Requested by the Client

Collateral is a marketing term used to describe the materials requested by a client for any given project. For example, if I’m working on some projects for College For A Weekend, Liberty’s four-day college visit, I might have 30-40 projects ranging from emails to class schedule booklets to temporary parking passes. However, I believe this step can easily be translated to fiction or even blog writing: make a list of key scenes/ideas.

Some authors write without an outline. They can just sit down and write their stories without any pre-planning. I’ve never been able to write without an outline, even if it’s only a few bullet points. But writing down the key scenes I want to include in my story or the main ideas I want to address in my blog post helps me get from one point to the next without running down a rabbit trail.

Note: An outline is not a binding agreement. You are not obligated to follow your outline once it’s written!

List the Styles that Will and Won’t Work for Your Audience

Now, this idea fascinated me. Until taking Lurie’s class, I didn’t really think about the style of writing I was using in my marketing pieces. But the more I thought about my audience, the more I realized that Gen Z doesn’t like being marketed to. So how am I supposed to market to Gen Z without them knowing they’re being marketed to? (Say that five times fast!) 

Through style.

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Most of my pieces are written in a teaching style. That is, they teach my audience about Liberty and then offer a call to action. (i.e., “Did you know you can receive $10,000 in awards and scholarships over four years just by submitting your refundable $250 Enrollment Deposit? We want to make college attainable for you; that’s why we offer generous scholarship packages and flexible payment plans. Don’t wait — submit your Enrollment Deposit today!”)

In creative writing, you need to choose the correct format for your writing — you need to know the purpose. In her session “Writing for the YA Audience” at the 2019 W2I conference, Melson reminded us that we shouldn’t be writing to tell young adults what to think. We should be writing to connect and entertain and then allow the audience to draw their own conclusions about the story, which may or may not be what we intended. 

While your audience may have different takeaways, you’ve given them a reading experience they are invested in rather than another textbook. It’s up to them to decide what to do with the material.

Tune-in on Dec. 5 for steps two and three, freewriting and writing your first draft!

About Emily

EmilyBabbitt is a promotional writer for Liberty University Marketing and specializes in residential undergraduate enrollment. She has done extensive research on Generation Z and has written for school-aged audiences in her work as a promotional writer and through contract work with Growing Leaders, Inc. In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with her husband, taking photos, and cooking. You can learn more about her work by visiting her website, EmilyMarlene.com, or connecting with her on LinkedIn.

 

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5 Things Journalism School Taught Me About Writing

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I graduated in May of 2019 with a Bachelor of Science in Journalism and immediately transitioned into a career in marketing. I’m still learning the ropes of copywriting, but many of the principles I learned in journalism school apply to both copywriting and creative writing. I’d love to share some of those things with you.

Interviewing Strangers

One of the first skills I learned in journalism school was how to conduct interviews. In class, my professor had us practice interviewing each other before she sent us to the nearby computer lab to talk to other students — to strangers.

Approaching unsuspecting, and potentially unwilling, strangers was terrifying at first, but over time, the action became easier. By my sophomore year, I was excited to interview strangers.

I’m glad I learned to talk to people and ask good questions early on in my education because so much of the program was based on that discipline. Without interviewing skills, many of my news stories would have been lackluster because people are the heart of a story.

My senior year, I wrote a news story about Main Street Lynchburg, Va., receiving new water lines and electrical systems — not the most interesting story in the world.

But when I added quotes from a quirky barista known as “Coco” and an elderly camera shop owner who thinks the project is “experimenting with other people’s livelihoods,” the story took on a new dimension. 

Whether you’re writing a newspaper article or a work of fiction, talking to others will breathe life into your story.

Simplicity is the Key to Good Writing

Most news is written at an eighth-grade reading level. Journalists intentionally write at a lower reading level so news can be accessible to readers. When writing, journalists use simple sentences and words to get their points across. 

Similarly, in copywriting, we use plain English. When writing to a diverse audience, it is best to write plainly and simply because your readers may have different levels of education. (Am I the only one who read magazine ads as a kid?)

While fiction writers have a more specific audience, I still believe simple writing is the best writing because it doesn’t distract the reader from the story.

Transitions are Hard

Copies of the Liberty Champion displayed on my dorm room wall circa 2017

Both transitions in writing and transitions in life are difficult. 

Traditionally, journalists had to write as simple and short as possible to fit their stories into just a few column inches of the paper. That doesn’t matter as much now with the internet being the primary vehicle for news, but there still isn’t much room for transitions in journalistic writing. 

Academic writing is different than journalistic writing. It’s fluffier and lengthier and more formulaic. Every paragraph is supposed to be bookended with an introduction and a conclusion, and every section is bookended with introductory and conclusive paragraphs. And on it goes. 

Journalistic writing doesn’t have the time for paragraphs dedicated solely to transitioning from one thought to the next, so I learned snappy words to transition quickly from one subject to the next without giving my readers whiplash.

Similarly, I learned that transitions in life are difficult. (See how I used the word “similarly” to transition my thoughts?) 

Transitioning from being a high school student with an interest in creative writing to a journalism student dedicated to fact-based writing was difficult. At first, I felt like my creativity was being stifled because of the blandness of journalism compared to the freedom of creative writing.

But as my education progressed, the blandness transformed into a challenge, and I learned to write true stories creatively.

Again, I’m going through a transition from a journalism student to a copywriting professional. My creativity often runs dry because the copy I write is predetermined by my clients. I don’t get to choose my projects or conduct the research myself — it’s all provided. 

Yet I’m learning to incorporate creativity into direct mail pieces and monthly offer emails. And I’m beginning to realize that creativity is not unrestrained. It’s a tool I can apply to everything I write, whether it is client-provided content or a short story from my heart.

Writing is Easy. Editing is Hard.

I never had a hard time sitting down to write my first draft. After completing my research, transcribing my interviews, and framing an outline, the first draft flowed onto the page in a few minutes. 

Going back and editing is the hard part. Now, I don’t mean checking for grammatical errors. I mean cutting out unnecessary words and sentences, rearranging the flow of the story, and sometimes going back to the drawing board.

Usually, my first drafts ran long — around 1,200 words. At my college newspaper, we had a limit of 750 words per article so everything would fit into our 16-page paper. 

That meant I had to cut out about 450 words every week. That’s a big chunk of text (and work)!

The hard part of editing my own writing is admitting to myself that the first draft isn’t perfect. Over time I learned that a first draft isn’t supposed to be perfect!

Once I accept that my writing isn’t perfect the first time around, I can usually effectively cut out a few hundred words. Before submitting my work, I wait a day and reread the piece with “fresh eyes.”

Don’t Waste your Mistakes

You’re going to make mistakes at some point in your writing career, and that’s okay. Whether it’s misspelling a name or overlooking a grammatical error, know that you can learn from your mistakes.

During my time with the school’s newspaper, I made my fair share of mistakes. So I kept a document of my common mistakes on my computer. That way, I could refer back to it when writing my stories. 

I also worked as a copy editor for the school’s newspaper for two years, and during that time, I made some embarrassing mistakes (like overlooking a misspelling on the front page). Making a checklist of things to look for when reviewing your work (or others’ work) is a great way to cut down on mistakes and improve your writing and editing skills.

What have you learned on your writing journey? I’d love to hear about the lessons you’ve learned in the comments below!

 

About Emily

Photo by Jim Smith

EmilyBabbitt is a promotional writer for Liberty University Marketing and specializes in residential undergraduate enrollment. She has done extensive research on Generation Z and has written for school-aged audiences in her work as a promotional writer and through contract work with Growing Leaders, Inc. In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with her husband, taking photos, and cooking. You can learn more about her work by visiting her website, EmilyMarlene.com, or connecting with her on LinkedIn.

 

Emily will be blogging for Write2Ignite on the first Thursday of every month. Her next post will be published on Nov. 7.

 

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How Write2Ignite is Unique

Most of you know that Write2Ignite is a conference to equip adult and teen writers of Christian-worldview literature for children and young adults. But what else does W2I provide?

One-on-One Consultations

Some conferences charge to schedule a one-on-one session with a faculty member. As a participant in Write2Ignite, you are entitled to two FREE consultations with the faculty member of your choice. This is a great opportunity to pitch your story, share your illustrations, or simply ask your burning questions!

Sign-ups for the 15 minute appointments with authors, agents, and publishers will begin at 5 PM on Friday, following the panel presentations. That gives you the opportunity to attend bonus and warm-up sessions and decide which professionals you want to talk to.  Brenda Covert will be available in the bookstore from 5-5:30 for those with questions about signing up. With the link to be announced on this website and W2I social media, you’ll be able to sign up on the electronic device of your choice (phone, tablet, laptop).

To sign up for an appointment, click on the link and scroll down the page until you see the (1–2) names of people you want to consult. (If you don’t have a way to do that, we’ll have staff available to help you.) Then check the available times, and type your name into an open space. Be sure to show up at the right time and place! Participating authors, editors, and agents will need to check the schedule for appointments!

If editors, presenters, or agents you prefer don’t have appointment slots available, you can still speak to them at the informal reception after Friday evening’s Session A workshops or visit with them during meal times. (The reception is scheduled for 8:45 – 9:30 pm in Hayes Ministry Center.) So don’t be shy!

Headshots

How many writing conferences have you attended where you had the opportunity to receive 4 to 6 professionally taken headshots suitable for business cards, book jackets, and social media at the nominal cost of $35.00? This is a great bonus for all W2I attendees.
Contact Cathy Biggerstaff at hiskid410@gmail.com to make an appointment. Check the workshop schedule before making your appointment to avoid missing part of a workshop you really wanted to take in. You’ll be able to sign up at the conference, but signing up ahead of time secures your time.

Silent Auction

A Silent Auction will be set up in Hayes Ministry Center. Items and services have been donated by supporters of Write2Ignite, with the proceeds to help provide conference programming. Stop by often to place your bids and check competing bids. Bid sheets will be taken up before the conference ends on Saturday and the items will be awarded during the final session giving you time to pay for and collect your treasures before you leave.
Auction items include writing critiques and writing books; a basket of home made soaps; a gift basket with Sentsy items; a pillow that a writer will love; and a gift certificate for a free painting opportunity with Truth Be Told Art. Rumor has it that Tony Snipes is donating a mystery prize!

Editors’ Choice Award

Another feature at W2I 2019 is the Editors’ Choice award. Editors, agents, or authors meeting in conferences with attendees can nominate a manuscript they deem worthy of publication. W2I Team or a designated third party will either select or draw names from eligible nominees. The manuscript must be for a children’s or YA publication and must reflect Christian worldview values.
 The nominee selected will win a certificate for Christian Book Proposals that provides a winning author with free use of the proposal service ($98 value). Christian Book Proposals, formerly Christian Manuscript Submissions, is a service of the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association (ECPA).
Writers, this is a great time to work on polishing your best manuscript as you look forward to individual appointments with two presenters!

 

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The Finishing Touch

Here’s a sneak peek at conference presenters with descriptions in their own words. We’ll be posting a teaser page each  Monday.

To register, visit: https://write2ignite.com/registration-2019/

 

Vijaya Bodach – Writing a Book that’s Controversial

 

Come to this workshop if you feel called to bring the Light of Christ to problems in this fallen world. What events in recent months have lit a fire under you to do something about them? Go ahead…list them. Pick ONE thing. Now, what can you reasonably expect to do? What can you do with the might of God supporting you? Dream. Write His Dream.

 

 

 

Attention Teens!

Carol Baldwin – Out of This World Fiction & Fantasy

Following up on Daniel Blackaby’s keynote and our previous workshops, we’ll consider important details to empower and invigorate your fantasy and science fiction stories. Consistency and believability are key!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Todd Williams – Connecting With Kids

We were all kids once. Should it really be that hard to relate? Sadly for writers, childhood sometimes seems far away. We will explore some specific characteristics of three age groups between 4 and 11 years old that will remind you of the struggles and joys of being a kid. More than that, we’ll look at creative writing strategies that can target those childhood traits in ways that will excite and energize their minds.

 

 

 

 

 

Jean Matthew Hall – “The Challenges of Writing Fiction Picture Books”

Join us for Jean Matthew Hall’s workshop, “The Challenges of Writing Fiction Picture Books” as we dig into great picture books to search for nine elements that can make your picture books great.

 

 

 

 

Andrea Merrell – Turning Pain Into Prose

Have you ever experienced pain? You know, the gut-wrenching kind that makes you feel as if you’re going under for the third time with no life preserver? Maybe it was a chronic illness, abuse, or a prodigal child. Perhaps it was divorce or even death. Pain affects us all to some degree, but God doesn’t waste a single thing that goes on in our life. He wants us to share our stories to offer hope to those who are hurting. “Turning Pain into Prose “will show you how to dig deeply into those painful experiences to find inspiration, passion, and purpose for your writing.

 

 

Steve Hutson – What NOT to Say to an Agent or Editor

No how matter how good your story, or how awesome your execution, it might not be enough. You still have to sell this thing. Learn what to say — and, very importantly — what NOT to say, when pitching your book.

CONGRATULATIONS to Diane Buie who won an autographed copy of Maiden of Iron: A Steampunk Novel from last week’s giveaway.

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It’s Not Self-Promotion

Marketing & Promotion

I was excited when my first book, Daily Reflections on the Names of God, was published several years ago. But my delight at the release of this project was tempered by the need to market it through a website, blog posts, newsletters, Facebook author page, Twitter, book signings, and other activities.

A conversation with an acquaintance highlighted the tension inherent in promotional activities. “Why are you doing book signings?” he asked. “If God wants your book to sell, then it will sell. You should trust Him.” His voice was tinged with reproach and his meaning was clear: a mature Christian should trust God rather than fall prey to the sin of self-promotion.

Marketing and promotion. I confess I’m uncomfortable with this part of a writer’s job. I dislike doing it and I hate that others—even family members—might mistake my actions for self-aggrandizement.

After all, I’m a Christian. The Bible tells me to be humble, to put others first, and—in the vernacular—to not toot my own horn. Proverbs 27:2 says to “Let another praise you, and not your own mouth; a stranger, and not your own lips.”

Still, publishing is a business, and that includes Christian publishing. In these days of staff cuts and diminishing budgets, most authors can no longer expect their publishers to roll out the red carpet to market their books. Even before a book is contracted these days, a traditional publisher wants to know what specific marketing plans you have for the project. If you’re not willing to promote your book, they probably won’t be willing to publish it.

My goal is to glorify God with my life. That includes my writing, which I believe is a gift He has given me. If this is true, then my goal must also be to glorify God in my marketing, just as I sought to glorify Him in writing.

This is not about me. I never want my marketing efforts to be self-aggrandizement. I don’t want to be the one waving her book high in the air, shouting “Look at me! Look at what I’ve done! Buy my book!”

Rather, I want to promote my books because they represent work God has done in and through me. He gave me an ability to use words for His glory. And He opened doors to publication in order to bless others. This is about what God has done. That’s what I want to say. I want to shout, “Look at my Creator! Look at my Redeemer! Look at what He has done! Look what He can do for you!”

The Bible tells us, “Whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God” (I Corinthians 10:31 NIV).

If, in order to do that, I need to “put myself out there” then that’s what I do. But I do it in the hope that others will be blessed by the work He gave me. And they, in turn, will proclaim what God is doing and has done for His glory.

So, yes, I will continue to tell people about what I’ve published. Not because I want to draw attention to myself, but because I believe what I write will be used by God to touch others for His glory. And if that’s what I truly believe, how can I not tell others? How can you not tell others what God has given you for His glory?

What has God given you to bless others? What are you doing with your gift?

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You’ll Love These Rise and Shine Workshops AND A GIVEAWAY

Here’s a sneak peek at conference presenters with descriptions in their own words. We’ll be posting a teaser page each  Monday. You still have time to take advantage of the Early Bird Discount.

Visit: https://write2ignite.com/registration-2019/

Tessa Emily Hall – How to Sell Your Book to an Agent: What to Do and What to Avoid

You’ve spent months, if not years, writing and polishing your manuscript to perfection. It’s finally time to send it off to agents! You have no doubt they will spot your storytelling gift immediately and beg for you to send the manuscript their way. 

After making a list of prospective agents, you write your query letter—and then off your submission goes into the publishing world. 

But the responses don’t roll in like you had expected. In fact, days go by. Then a week. 

Finally, an email pops into your inbox. An agent! You open the email, preparing for the glowing response . . . but it’s not the manuscript request that you had expected. Instead, it’s a rejection letter. 

Does this sound familiar? It’s no secret: The submission process to a literary agent is often just as hard as writing the book itself. The competition is tough, and the slush piles are high. An agent could fall in love with your writing, storytelling ability, and still feel as though he/she would not be a good fit for you. 

So how can you, an aspiring author, capture the attention of an agent? Is it possible to write a query letter in such a way that your email rises to the top of their submissions pile? And finally, is there a reason for all of these rejections—and what can you do to decrease your chances of receiving one? 

In my workshop, How to Sell Your Book to an Agent: What to Do and What to Avoid, I will discuss the answers to all of these questions and share secrets on how you can stand out. You will learn how to properly submit to a literary agent in a way that has the agent begging for more. 

That way, you will someday receive that manuscript request you have been waiting for. 

Kim Peterson – Developing a Strong Supporting  Cast of Secondary Characters

From the moment Anne of Green Gables smashes her slate over Gilbert Blythe’s head, their competition makes her stronger, faster, smarter and, eventually, a better person. Readers wouldn’t understand Anne half so well without Gilbert Blythe. That’s the purpose of memorable secondary characters: Hermione Granger and Ron Weasley give insight into Harry Potter, Hector Zeroni knows the truth behind Stanley Yelnats’ innocence long before Stanley does, and Dorothy wouldn’t have made it home without the rather-smart Scarecrow, the compassionate Tin Man, and the Lion who truly is the King of the Forest. Learn to craft compelling secondary characters that make your protagonist unforgettable, without stealing the show.

Vijaya Bodach’s Workshop – Writing Memoir for Kids (Part I): Techniques

 

Learn some basic techniques of writing memoir for kids. Think back to your childhood. Begin with: I remember…my favorite place, my best friend, my favorite game. Go. Give yourself 5 min for each. Now write: I don’t remember…Wait, you say, how can I write something I don’t remember? We often suppress difficult times, but you’ll be surprised how much you remember if you allow yourself to. I don’t remember…the kid who was mean to me; the time I lied to my parents about…; when my pet went missing…Go. Give yourself another 5 minutes for each. These and other exercises will develop your memoir techniques. 

Lori Hatcher’s Workshop – Ten Ways to Charm an Editor       

As a writer and a magazine editor, I’ve sat on both sides of the editorial desk. I’ve received rejections letters and I’ve sent them. Over the years I’ve identified six sure-fire ways to earn points with your editors and four mistakes to doom your submission to the shredder. I’ve also learned that editors are not God. It’s okay (and sometimes necessary) to disagree with them. We’ll talk about why and how to do this and still maintain a positive relationship. In this fast-paced workshop, I’ll give you a sneak peek into the mind of an editor and share proven tips to help your editors say YES to your next submission.

 

 

Attention Teens! – Brenda Covert – Poetry Workshop: Playing with Words

Question: What do an eraser, paint chips, and Africa have in common?

Answer: They are all inspiration for the poetry teens will write in the Playing with Words workshop!

Brenda Covert’s interactive poetry workshop will help teen poets refine their creative voice as they learn to write 3 different types of poems. Students will also have a chance to share their work in class. Whether a student has yet to write a poem or has written volumes, all are welcome to come have fun playing with words!

GIVEAWAY

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Finally Friday AND TWO GIVEAWAYS!

Here’s a sneak peek at conference presenters with descriptions in their own words. We’ll be posting a teaser page each  Monday. You still have time to take advantage of the Early Bird Discount.

Visit: https://write2ignite.com/registration-2019/

Tony Snipes – 5 MORE Things I Learned in Corporate America

 

What do you and CBS have in common? You create stories for an audience to consume…and so do they. You try to grow your audience with those stories while staying true to your values…and so do they. You have a need to generate resources that support the creation of those stories…and so do they.

There are practices that corporate content creators have been putting in effect for decades that allow them to distribute their stories and generate a profit while they do it.

This workshop will give you access to an insider’s view of corporate
storytellers. Corporate storytellers such as The Greenville News and local CBS affiliate WSPA have a lot in common with you as a writer: the need to create stories and earn a living in the process.

In my workshop, “Five MORE Things I Learned from Corporate America that Help Your Writing Business Pay for Itself ” we’ll unpack what I learned from corporate America that help your writing business pay for itself.

 

Edie Melson – Love the World You Build

As fiction writers, we are world builders. It doesn’t matter what genre we pursue, we are still creating an imaginary place for readers to hang out and experience our stories. These worlds are limited only by our imagination. But just like in the physical world, there are rules we must follow—a lot of the time we get to make up the rules—but there are still rules.
In my workshop, “Love the World You Build,” I share how to build a consistent world that makes sense for your reader. We’ll discuss the power of language and invented words, research for places that have actually existed and how to make your setting an important character in the story you tell.

 

 

 

Linda Vigen Phillips – Using Verse to Get to the Heart of Your Story

                                       

Writing a verse novel may not be your intention or even your cup of tea, but writing in verse can be good for your writing health.  As writers, we all mine our past, and capturing difficult or sensitive memories in verse is a therapeutic exercise that can lead to strong story elements.  Suffering from writer’s block? Throw rules out the window and jot down whatever comes to mind in a free-verse format. Want to probe deeper into your characters?  Have them write their hearts out in verse. This method is particularly effective in capturing the depth and voice of a protagonist on a spiritual journey.  

In, “Using Verse to Get to the Heart of Your Story,” we will explore a variety of formats that authors have used successfully in their verse novels.  Participants will have the opportunity to turn an emotionally charged memory or idea into free verse, and to use a shape poem to show setting, action, or mood.   

 

Kenzi Nevins – An ILLUSTRATOR’S Market: Portfolio, Platform, and Proposals

 

Imagine walking into a bookstore and seeing a line of stuffed animals above the children’s book section…but these aren’t just any animals, they’re yours! The illustrations from your book, brought to life. What does it take to stand out in today’s increasingly freelance illustration market? What tools does an illustrator need once the drawings are finished to have kids, adults, and EDITORS begging for more? Come to “An Illustrator’s Market: Portfolio, Platform, and Proposals” to find out!

 

                     

Nancy Lohr – The Plot Thickens

 

An idea, an emotion, a hero or heroine (the protagonist) all are necessary elements to include in a novel for children, but none of these are suitable for a strong and compelling plot. My workshop. “The Plot Thickens” will look at a variety of ways to develop a plot that will hold a reader’s attention and deliver a satisfying forward-moving story.

 

 

                                     

                                      Attention Teens

Carol Baldwin – Let Your Characters Do the Heavy Work

 

Try this recipe for story success: Start with a memorable, authentic protagonist. Add a complicated, believable antagonist. Put them into a sensory setting and watch what conflicts ensue.  In this workshop, we’ll complete several writing exercises that will help you deepen your unforgettable, true-to-life characters.

 

                                                     

 

Two Giveaways