Life After a Writers’ Conference

by Diane Buie

How can I capture in words what last year’s Write2Ignite conference meant to me? Attending my first-ever writers’ conference left me feeling (and probably looking) like a deer in headlights! I left with an overwhelming conviction of the need for Christian writers and with a vast amount of information gleaned from each workshop. God lit […]

Conference Critiques Reminder and Availability

Write2Ignite Conference Critiques are available from now to the beginning of September. (See “send by” dates in the chart below. A key is included below the chart to help you interpret abbreviations in the chart.)

Conference Critiques are only for registered conferees. They include a face-to-face fifteen-minute meeting at the Write2Ignite conference with a pro you choose from the chart below to critique your work (see page limits on our critiques page). Check the chart to ensure that you choose a person who critiques the type of work you’re submitting. The fee is $35 per manuscript critiqued.

Each critique will give you a thorough review of the strengths and weaknesses of your writing, offer suggestions for improvement, and help you identify potential markets. For full details, see our critiques page.

Write2Ignite 2018: Conference Critiques Availability

Critique Faculty

# YA MG NFB ERC PB SS NFA P D C A Send by
Carol Baldwin 3 X X X X 9/1
Daniel Blackaby 4 X X X X 9/5
Jenny Cote 3 X X X X X X 9/1
Brenda Covert 4 X X X X X X 9/1
Jean Hall 3 X X X X 8/31
Vicki Moss 4 X X X X X X X 9/1
Kim Peterson 4 X X X X X X X X X X X 9/5

Chart Key

# = Number of submissions a faculty member will critique

YA = Young adult novel

MG = Middle grade novel

NFB = Nonfiction book

ERC = Early reader/chapter book

PB = Picture book

SS = Short story

NFA = Nonfiction article

P = Poetry

D = Devotional

C = Curriculum

A = Activity book/pages

Type of Manuscript

Young adult novel—Submit book proposals for teens/young adults: cover letter to editor, chapter outline/synopsis, and the first pages of the manuscript, up to 10 pages total

Middle grade novel—Book proposals for children: cover letter to editor, chapter outline/synopsis, and the first pages of the manuscript, up to 10 pages total

Nonfiction book—Book proposals for children: cover letter to editor, chapter outline/synopsis, and the first pages of the manuscript up to 10 pages total

Picture book—Complete manuscript up to 1,000 words

Early reader/chapter book—First chapters up to 10 pages

Nonfiction article—1,200 word limit

Short story—1,200 word limit

Poetry—5 poems equal 1 critique; 40-line limit for each poem

Devotional—500-word limit each; up to 4 devotionals per paid critique

Curriculum—A table of contents and 2–5 chapters; up to 10 pages

Activity book/pages—Up to 10 pages

Manuscript Submission Procedure

Submit a manuscript for critique in any of the categories listed above. Email your manuscript to our critique facilitator, Brenda Covert, at bbcovert123@gmail.com, and place “W2I CRITIQUE ENTRY” in the subject line. You’ll receive a written one-page critique or comments written on your pages. Include in the email text your name, email address, title, and category. You may submit as many manuscripts as you wish, as long as you pay the fee for each one.

Sneak Peek: Dot by Dot

by Vicki Moss

Hi, there. Vicki Moss—contributing editor of Southern Writers Magazine and author—here. Looks like we’re fast approaching September and the Write2Ignite conference, and as usual, I can’t wait to cross the South Carolina line. This year, I’ll be teaching two classes: “The Journey towards Finding Your Writing Voice” and “Connecting the Dots.” Believe it or not, […]

Sneak Peek: Lori Hatcher’s Workshop, “The Day I Wanted to Quit”

by Lori Hatcher

Your proposal is rejected—again—and your head swirls with doubt, disappointment, and confusion. You pour your heart out in a blog post, take hours to format it just right, click Post, and wait. The only buzz you hear is from the ceiling fan above your head, and the only comments you receive are from your mother […]

Follow the Signs

by Ava Pennington

Ahhh, summertime. There’s something about taking a road trip in the summer, convertible top down, wind in our hair. It brings out the teenager in all of us. Of course, I don’t have a convertible, but I can dream, can’t I? The drives in my dreams almost always include an open road, maybe a long, […]

Sneak Peek: Daniel Blackaby’s Presentations for W2I 2018

by Daniel Blackaby

“The Journey Begins: Step-by-Step Preparation for Beginning the Writer’s Journey” People often say, “It’s not how you start; it’s how you finish that counts.” The problem is, you can’t finish what you don’t start! So many talented writers never achieved their dream of finishing a book, simply because they never learned how to get started. […]

Speaker Spotlight: Tessa Emily Hall’s Keynote Address “Worshipping Our Creator through Our Creations”

We were created to create. Even when writing becomes our career, we can still use it as a means to spend time with our Creator and glorify Him through the process. He ignited the flame of creativity in us, and we should offer it back to Him in the form of worship.

Teens—through Tessa Emily Hall’s teens-only keynote address “Worshipping Our Creator through Our Creations,” you’ll be inspired to offer your daily writing sessions as a sacrifice of worship to God and learn how spending time with Him can help you tap into your God-given creativity. Thus, you’ll not only draw closer to Him during this process but also enable your readers to come to know Him as well.

Tessa is an award-winning author who writes inspirational yet authentic YA fiction to show teens they’re not alone. Her passion for shedding light on clean entertainment and media for teens led her to a career as an associate agent at Hartline Literary Agency, YA acquisitions editor for Illuminate YA (LPC Imprint), and founder/editor of PursueMagazine.net. Tessa’s first teen devotional, Coffee Shop Devos, will release with Bethany House in September 2018.

She’s guilty of making way too many lattes and never finishing her to-read list. When her fingers aren’t flying 116 WPM across the keyboard, she can be found speaking to teens, decorating art journals, and acting in Christian films. Her favorite way to procrastinate is by connecting with readers on her blog, mailing list, social media (@tessaemilyhall), and website: TessaEmilyHall.com.