Book Review: A Book for Writers by Jean Hall

A Review by Jean Matthew Hall of STEERING THE CRAFT: A TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY GUIDE TO SAILING THE SEA OF STORY by Ursula K. LeGuin Dear Writers, If the beauty of language thrills you; If you love weaving words, sounds and silences as they move readers through a story; If you admire and respect the power…

Bullet Journaling: Organizing Your Writing Life in the New Year

Bullet Journal: Decorative Stickers

Are you looking forward to a New Year with no mistake (to paraphrase Anne of Green Gables)? Have you been searching for another way to keep track of all your writerly progress? Enter THE BULLET JOURNAL!! It's a unique method for organizing your life - no matter what your profession. I have been using the bullet…

Reflections on Writing Dialogue by Emily Babbitt

As I've transitioned from news writing to fiction writing over the past few years, I've learned that writing dialogue is much different than recording quotes. I can't tell you how many hours I spent transcribing interviews during my undergraduate degree in journalism. Every story I wrote for the school newspaper required at least two interviews,…

Why I’m excited for the Writing Fiction Master Class (and why you should be too)! by Jean Hall

Write2Ignite’s Writing Fiction Master Class is coming up Sept. 19! In just two weeks, author Joyce Moyer Hostetter will be presenting three sessions to help attendees learn more about fiction writing. Plus, the Write2Ignite team will be leading three workshops to help you apply the skills you learn during Hostetter’s sessions.  Last year, I had…

5 Tips for Using and Understanding Literal and Metaphorical Language, Part III by Deborah DeCiantis

  TIP #3 Don’t avoid tough literal situations by referring to them only as metaphors. Taking literal language metaphorically is equally problematic.                         Kids can be masters of metaphor. Ask “Didn’t I tell you not to play in the mud?” and they answer, “We weren’t playing, we were making a snack for the frogs.” One child,…

5 Tips for Using and Understanding Literal and Figurative Language Part II by Deborah DeCiantis

  TIP #2 Don’t interpret literally what is supposed to be understood metaphorically. Taking figurative language literally is a problem that leads to misunderstanding and misinterpretation. Does the photo above depict sunshine or shadow? A literal book title based on this image might be Sunshine on the Pages or Shadows on the Pages [When Grandpa Reads]. A nonfiction…

9 Tips for Writing Unforgettable Characters by Deborah DeCiantis

According to Elaine Marie Alphin (Creating Characters Kids Will Love p. 2) “Kids read because a magical closeness springs up between them and the characters in books and stories—the same magical closeness I felt as a child. They read because a writer has brought a character to life on the page for them.” Every great…

The Challenge of Interpreting Culture by Emily Babbitt

Some stories — even if written during a different time — are applicable to every generation of teens because they help with interpreting culture.   First published in 1967, The Outsiders, by S.E. Hinton, has inspired readers for more than 50 years. Hinton, just fifteen years old when she began writing the book, was inspired by…

Inspired by History by Jarm Del Boccio

  Paris is one of my favorite cities. Its history and ambiance intrigue me. There is something about strolling down the streets of Paris, crossing the bridges, or walking along the Seine, even in the rain, that can't be experienced anywhere else in the world. It has a certain "Je ne sais pas" (I don't know…