5 Tips for Using and Understanding Literal and Metaphorical Language, Part IV

TIP#4 Recognize valid situations where literal and metaphorical meanings co-exist.

Statements may have both literal and metaphorical meanings without being ambiguous, equivocal, or contradictory.

Acronyms and acrostics, homonyms and antonyms, sound devices like alliteration and rhyme, humor, and even puns, function as literal content and also as helpful memory aids. Today’s icons, emoticons, GIFs, and memes combine devices like humor, symbol, and satire as communication shortcuts We see these in a wide variety of settings, from personal message to social media posts, advertising, and meetings.

Literal and metaphorical fusion in a class children’s tale

In Winnie-the-Pooh, Christopher Robin and his animal friends set off on an “expotition” [sic] to find the North Pole. It soon becomes apparent that they have no idea what this geographic “pole” literally is. They envision an object “stuck in the ground.” Amid this lighthearted fun at young children’s innocent misinterpretation, the group’s conclusion that they have, in fact, discovered the pole is not only a literal event but also a symbolic one.

When Roo falls into the river and is swept downstream, Pooh finds a long pole to use in rescuing him. Afterward, the characters decide that they’ve accomplished their mission. Placing the pole in the ground, they name it the “North Pole” and label it with a sign attributing its discovery to Pooh. Its metaphorical significance, however, is twofold. First, it affirms the value of Pooh’s quick thinking despite his often being characterized as a “bear of little brain.” Second, it commemorates the group’s efforts to save a friend in danger. The North Pole, a literal point of geographic orientation, also frequently symbolizes an ideal destination. A. A. Milne fuses both meanings in this delightful tale.

Biblical teaching models

Numerous examples of “both/and” meanings exist in Scripture. Referring to the history of God’s covenant with Abraham, Paul explains its spiritual significance. He uses the term “allegory” in Galatians 4 to show differences between law and grace, referring to both old and new covenants and “Jerusalem.”

In Ephesians 5, Paul describes God’s design for husband-wife relationships as literal practice, but also refers allegorically in v. 32 to “Christ and the Church.”

Claims and counter-claims often focus on interpretation of literal situations, but many lead also to metaphorical expression.

  • Pharisees called Jesus a literal commandment-breaker when He healed people on the Sabbath. He stated His actual purpose to fulfill God’s law and commandments.
  • The gospel encounter when Jesus insisted that children be allowed to come to Him leads to a teaching point. As these children come to God in faith, believers of all ages must recognize their need to seek God as their Father.
  • He supplies a bountiful catch of literal fish, and calls the disciples to become “fishers of men.”

Applying biblical models in children’s and YA stories

John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress uses allegory to retell the gospel as a quest journey in his own culture’s terms. Each character, place, and event represents a biblical parallel, with Christian recognizing his overpowering guilt and need to get rid of his sin “burden” as family and neighbors oppose his determination to set off for the Celestial City. At each stop along the way, readers share Christian’s experiences and find a new insight into faith, hope, doubt, failure, or commitment.

Max Lucado uses allegorical and symbolic elements to deliver literal truth in You Are Special. Stars and dots represent good and bad opinions people express about others, including the main character, Punchinello. He meets Lucia, who is immune to these “stickers” because she ignores them, instead forming her opinion of herself directly from Eli, the Maker. Her name, which means “light,” symbolizes wisdom and freedom found in the truth of God’s Word.

Questions for writers

Do stories you read or write treat literal and metaphorical references as mutually exclusive? How can children’s and YA literature help readers recognize situations in which one person, event, or object that has actually existed or happened, has added significance? Do you have a favorite example? We welcome your comments or questions below, on social media, or email: info.write2ignite@gmail.com

 

 

Write2Ignite

Reflections from a Fiction Master Class

Write2Ignite

 

 

 

 

 

Our logo truly became a reality to me last Saturday as I attended the online Fiction Master Class taught by the gifted Joyce Moyer Hostetter. Not only has she written a popular MG Historical fiction series, but she is able to impart her knowledge of writing to her students in a simple and engaging way.

Ships, Secrets, and Survivors: A Book Review and a Giveaway!

Ships, Secrets, and Survivors, the debut novel by Sarah Rodecker and Helena George, caught my eye when it was announced. It promised assassins on the run, swashbuckling pirates, and mysterious murders. As I had never read a pirate fantasy novel before, I didn’t know what to expect when I picked it up, but I was not disappointed.

From the very first page, I was thrown into a unique world with talking ships and plenty of knives to spare. Ravin, an assassin-in-training, runs away from his prestigious family of killers, risking death if he is discovered. Then, a few weeks later, his name is announced at Selection Day, an annual event that picks young men and women to compete for the chance to become ambassadors. Since Ravin never wanted to be a part of this program, he sets out to find the person who volunteered his name. However, he ends up with more serious problems on his hands as a series of mysterious murders occur. With the murderers on his tail, he joins forces with others chosen on Selection Day, including the Princess Adi. They journey with the crew of the Red Wind, whose goals is to take down the elusive Captain Martin and the assassins in league with him.

The story’s plot is consistently engaging and fast-paced. Battles ensue around every corner against sea dragons, assassins, and pirates. At the same time, though, it’s the little moments that really make this story shine. The interactions among the Red Wind’s crew, such as an archery competition, were entertaining and made me smile. The Red Wind herself, a talking ship, adds a splash of magic to the book with her interesting insights and her relationship with the crew. My personal favorite scenes were the touching conversations between Ravin and Adi late at night. They really showed the depth of these characters.

While some of the minor villains could use more character development, most other characters were deep and fascinating. Ravin’s story really struck me in particular. His journey of moving on from his fear of the past was touching, and while I won’t give away the book’s ending, his arc had a satisfying conclusion. Meanwhile, Adi’s character arc was the most interesting. It was a fantastic way of saying our dreams can come true, even if it’s not in the way that we expect. However, the most powerful theme was one of self-sacrifice, of fighting against evil, and of pushing past personal fears to do the right thing. And that is what will stick with me most of all from this book.

Ships, Secrets, and Survivors was an interesting, engaging book with great messages. I closed the book with a bittersweet, yet satisfied, feeling.  And while it works well as a standalone, book two will surely be an entertaining addition to the series.

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Giveaway

If you would like to win a paperback copy of this book, please leave a comment by September 24. This would make a great gift for the teen book lover in your life!

About the Author

Helena occasionally blogs for Write2Ignite. Check out her posts: Welcome, Helena George (on her first W2I conference) and Tips for Productive Writing.

 

Nicole Dust is a Catholic dark chocolate lover who spends way too much time listening to musicals. Her love of the fantastical leads her to tell stories about other worlds, magic, and broken characters needing redemption. When she’s not writing, you can find her watching YouTube, blogging at legendofawriter.blogspot.com, or taking bookstagram pictures with the handle @nicoledustwriter.

Disappointment

Disappointment is His Appointment

Have you ever experienced disappointment?

Silly question, isn’t it? Because we’ve all been disappointed at one time or another. We live in a broken, sin-sick world. Disappointment is part of the package.

But it’s not the only part.

I know. Because I’ve lived this out.

Four years ago, my husband was diagnosed with cancer. A year later, we rejoiced at the news that the cancer was in remission. Sadly, his status changed within a few months. The cancer came back. And so did the chemo sessions. Blood tests. Scans. Nausea. Fatigue. Then acceptance of the inevitable.

And gut-wrenching disappointment.

Is that where you are today? Perhaps it’s cancer or another diagnosis. Maybe it’s a broken marriage. Or a prodigal child making destructive choices . . . again.

Your disappointment may not be related to a life-threatening situation and maybe you feel ashamed to compare it to the experiences of others. But disappointment crosses all levels of life circumstances. And if you’re a writer, seeing your publishing dreams stymied can generate severe disappointment, too.

But as songwriter Phil Keaggy wrote, “Disappointment – His Appointment.” God’s appointment for growth. For spiritual intimacy with Him. For receiving comfort so we in turn can comfort others. And for living out our faith even in the most difficult times, because that’s when others will see real faith lived out in the one, real God.

This doesn’t mean God is unloving or uncaring. It does mean He sees a bigger picture than we do. He has a plan for our ultimate good and His eternal glory. And His plan may include experiences that, with our limited perspective, we would not choose for ourselves.

We also have another set of choices. My natural inclination is to demand answers from God. If I’m honest, what I’m really doing is saying that His ways don’t meet my approval and He owes me an explanation. But God doesn’t owe me—or anyone else—an explanation for what He allows.

The better choice is to rest in my relationship with Him. Trust instead of demand. Live out the reality of my faith with the assurance that He is trustworthy. Know that I know He loves me.

Christians understand this temporary life is not all there is. Something greater than today’s suffering is at stake. The apostle Paul wrote in Romans 8:18, “I consider that our present sufferings are not worth comparing with the glory that will be revealed in us.”

And a few verses later we read, “For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (v. 38).

By the strength of the Holy Spirit, we can live without fear and worry. Listen as He reminds us of His Word. Receive comfort in His indwelling presence. And rest in the assurance that this life is not all there is, regardless of whatever obstacles life throws our way.

You’re not alone in your disappointment. Because of Jesus Christ, we know who we belong to. And we trust Him. We trust Him with ourselves, our families, and yes, even our writing.

We all have a choice. Whatever happens today, in your writing or in any other area of life, how will you choose to handle disappointment?

DRIVE: A Book Review by Kathryn Dover (and a Giveaway!)

When I first heard about the Baker Mountain series by Joyce Moyer Hostetter, Drive, the fourth book in the series, sounded the most interesting. Drive occurs several years after the previous novel, Comfort, and follows the story of Ida and Ellie Honeycutt, Ann Fay’s younger twin sisters.

 REVIEW

The cover of Drive is stunning; the image with both twins, a boy, and two old race cars instantly intrigued me. The story picks up almost where Comfort left off. Ann Fay’s father is still suffering from his war wounds, and Junior is still in love with Ann Fay. The plot pace is a little slow, but the story keeps moving. The style is also different from that of the previous three novels because it alternates between two perspectives instead of using only one, going back and forth between the different perspectives of Ida and Ellie.

Both twins are transitioning to high school, and Ida feels that Ellie is trying to put distance between them. At a glance, both twins seem complete opposites: Ida is shy, while Ellie is outgoing. Ida’s shyness originates in a scene from Comfort where her father mistakenly slams her against the wall. After that, Ida ceases to be outgoing and becomes very meek and shy. Ellie instantly takes her place. Life becomes a competition, and the twins are constantly in conflict with each other. However, the novel’s greatest conflict arises when the twins fight over the same boy.

The story is historically accurate: the Korean war and continuing polio epidemic are important to the story. In addition, the story takes place during the first year of NASCAR racing at the Hickory Speedway, near Bakers Mountain. Ellie loves the fast-paced, dangerous racing, while Ida is frightened by the danger and loud noises. The NASCAR races become important to the story’s theme, thus leading to the novel’s title, Drive.

The word “drive” serves a dual meaning, much like “blue” does in the series’ second novel, Blue. The first meaning is figurative: a motivation to succeed. Ida feels that Ellie has “the drive” to succeed while Ida does not. “Drive” also serves as a metaphor for Ida and Ellie’s stormy relationship, which Ida states as, “Remember. . . When Daddy slammed me up against the wall? It scared me so bad I couldn’t breathe. I guess I was like one of those race cars that gets smashed and then it just limps around the track. But you stepped on the gas and kept going. Enjoying all the attention you could. You got ahead of me, Ellie. You liked being first. And you sure do hate losing. But it’s not a race. It’s just both of us driving the best way we know how” (236).

By the end of the novel, the twins have matured greatly. Ellie matures by being more considerate, selfless, and respectful towards others. Ida learns she is capable of more than she ever dreamed, she is just as strong and as smart as Ellie. The ending is perfect. Ellie gets what she has been wanting the entire novel, and both twins have learned a valuable lesson in selfishness. Drive is very emotion-provoking; the bond between Ellie and Ida is stronger than they realize. I have enjoyed the entire Baker Mountain series and recommend them to teenagers and young adults. I think Blue is my favorite, though I eagerly await the next novel, Equal, coming in Spring 2021. I expect it to be equally enjoyable.

 

Kathryn Dover lives in South Carolina with her family including three cats (and counting!), a dog, two fish, and many house plants. She attends Presbyterian College and is studying Math and Creative Writing. She enjoys playing the piano, reading, and writing plays.

 

 

 

 

 

GIVEAWAY

Boyds Mills & Kane donated a hardback copy of Drive for one of you to win! Leave a comment by Thursday, September 17th and we will enter your name.

FICTION MASTER CLASS

Joyce is leading our first Master Class on September 19. For more information, please click here. One attendee will receive all four books that have been published in the Bakers Mountain series. The fifth book, Equal, comes out in April 2021.

 

Registration ends TODAY!

 

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