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Decisions, Decisions

Here’s a sneak peek at conference presenters with descriptions in their own words. We’ll be posting a teaser page each  Monday. You still have time to take advantage of the Early Bird Discount.

Visit: https://write2ignite.com/registration-2019/

 

Kim Peterson – Deepen Your Middle Grade & Young Adult Novels

In this hands-on workshop, explore how to make your MG and YA novels more compelling. First, determine your novel’s theme and learn ways to reveal that message to the readers, making it memorable. Then, get to know your characters better by deepening characterization: explore your characters’ goals, what motivates them to pursue those goals, and how conflict grows your characters as they overcome obstacles. Finally, transport your readers into your
novel’s setting. Whether your characters visit the past, the present, the future, or a new land, learn how to create a place your readers want to visit often.

 

Nancy Lohr – Read Like a Writer

Just as athletes watch game tapes to study other athletes, writers need to analyze the work of other writers. You should read widely and read well both for inspiration and instruction. Whether intuitively or intentionally, writers need to read with a different focus and greater awareness than the average reader does. This workshop will examine various techniques for reading like a writer.

Attention Teens! Carol Baldwin – Creating a Sensory Setting

The Lord has given us five senses. So, why do we just describe things which our characters see? In this hands-on workshop we’ll touch, taste, hear, smell, AND see things that our characters may experience in different settings.

 

 

 

How I Turned a Facebook Page Into a Weekly Storytelling Medium.

I  give you a box with an “ON” switch in the palm of your hand.
I then tell you to close your eyes and think about a couple of those
publishing ideas you’ve been kicking around. While your eyes are still closed, I task you to choose one of those ideas…the one story you feel most people have the most excitement for.

You choose that one topic and then you open your eyes! Now you immediately flip the switch and you discover that what you’ve actually launched with that switch was…your own weekly magazine with content based on the idea you chose! This magazine you just published is full color, distributed all over the nation and has an audience that loving greats you each week, ready to consume more content related to your story.

If something like this is real, it simply couldn’t be free. And it’s not. What it costs is a little time, in exchange for your first 1,000 readers. Attend “How I Turned a Facebook Page Into a Weekly Storytelling Medium” and you will leave with a roadmap that reflects how Tony converted a Facebook business page into a weekly publication with an audience of readers from 0 to 5,000 people. No tricks or internet shortcuts, but proven steps applied to a modern reading platform.

Samantha Bell – Polishing Your Picture Book

You finally have the text of your picture book down on paper. You’ve heard every manuscript should be revised, but yours is only a few hundred words long. What more could it need? You’ll find out in Polishing Your Picture Book! In this workshop, attendees may bring along a copy of their works-in-progress. As a group, we’ll read as many as time allows. Then we’ll consider ways to polish the manuscript to get it ready for submission. Even if your story is still in the idea stage, you’ll learn valuable tips for writing your own picture book!  

 

 

Daniel Blackaby – Tolkien, Lewis, & Christian Imagination

Daniel Blackaby

How would you feel if your best friends called your book “almost worthless” or a “carelessly written jumble”? This was J. R. R. Tolkien’s review of C. S. Lewis’ The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. The two dear friends are forever linked together as fathers of Christian fiction and Art, but each had a radically different idea of what Christian fiction should be. Their greatest legacy was not to establish a narrow template for Christian writers to follow, but to demonstrate that there is no template. In this seminar, Daniel Blackaby will explore these two vastly different approaches and showcase the great freedom you have as a Christian writer. 

 

Part 1: What are YOU looking forward to at Write2Ignite 2019?

With so many great workshops to pick from, I thought we’d share what our team is excited about. But don’t limit your choices to ours, you have many more to consider!

 

 

Brenda Covert

I’m torn between the workshop about “Connecting with Kids” by editor-in-chief Todd Williams of Union Gospel Press, and the workshop called “Ten Ways to Charm an Editor” by magazine editor and freelance writer Lori Hatcher. Then there is the always entertaining Tony Snipes bringing his creative flare with “How I Turned a Facebook Page into a Weekly Storytelling Medium.” I love that Write2ignite offers workshops on writing, editing, marketing, and the use of social media!

 

 

Gail Cartee

Since I’m scheduling the teaser posts, I get to read everybody’s first. Every time a new one comes in I think, “Oooooo, I’d like to hear that.”My favorite genres are historical fiction and science for kids. I’d love to hear Vanessa Fortenberry and learn how she organizes her research. I love verse and its rhythm. Linda Vigen Phillips “Using Verse to Get to the Heart of Your Story” is also one of my top choices. Vijaya Bodach’s workshop on Writing Memoir for Kids strikes a note with me. I used to think my grandma really had a lot to share because she was so old (102) but I’ve had some experiences too I’d like to know how to share in interesting ways. I’d like to up the influence of my blog. I think if I can make it to another workshop I’d love Tessa Emily Hall’s “Create Book Buzz by Coordinating a Blog Tour.” Of course, the keynotes are the icing on the cake that pulls everything together. Can’t wait to learn all the great ways to grow as a writer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diane Buie

I am super excited to hear Edie Melson when she arrives at the conference. I had the pleasure of participating, online, with a Bible study called, “Soul Care for Writers.” It was fantastic, refreshing, real, and deeply encouraging. I would listen to whatever she had to offer to those of us who calls ourselves, “creatives, writers, illustrators, etc.” Edie has a voice of wisdom I would always take note of.

 

Deborah DeCiantis

Of course, I’m looking forward to Nancy Lohr’s keynote on Truth-FULL writing, because I’m eager to see how she will illustrate this principle with examples from various writers, and Edie Melson’s keynote on “The New Paradigm of Social Media” because it’s hard to keep up with all the changes, and I know she will have a lot of tips for maximizing our platforms (as individual writers) and effective communication in different media. She usually includes tips to help save time as we work in these different media. For workshops, as a Tolkien and Lewis fan, I want to hear Daniel Blackaby’s discussion of Christian imagination in their works and others’, but I am also fascinated by Linda Vigen Phillips’ free verse novels (I am reading the second one now), and learning how she refined this technique for her books. So many choices – I don’t know how many I will be able to take in, but if I make it to a third workshop, it will probably be Vijaya Bodach’s talk on tackling controversial subjects in YA literature.

Carol Baldwin

One of the things I enjoy about Write2Ignite is the atmosphere. Yes, you heard me right. I’ve been to lots of writing conferences and the spirit of Write2Ignite is encouragement and helpfulness. We are all in this process of writing and publishing together–and the team and presenters reflect that.

Secondly, I’m excited to sit in on Daniel Blackaby’s “World Building” workshop for teens and to hear his presentation on Christian Imagination. I’m also looking forward to Lori Hatcher’s presentation on “A Strong Supporting Cast of Secondary Characters” and Nancy Lohr’s keynote on “Truth-Full Writing.” If I can, I’d like to catch Vijaya Bodach’s presentation on “Writing A Memoir Part II–Being a Witness.”

Next week some of our attendees will share what they are looking forward to attending. It’s going to be an exciting, jam-packed weekend! We hope you will join us!

 

Finally Friday AND TWO GIVEAWAYS!

Here’s a sneak peek at conference presenters with descriptions in their own words. We’ll be posting a teaser page each  Monday. You still have time to take advantage of the Early Bird Discount.

Visit: https://write2ignite.com/registration-2019/

Tony Snipes – 5 MORE Things I Learned in Corporate America

 

What do you and CBS have in common? You create stories for an audience to consume…and so do they. You try to grow your audience with those stories while staying true to your values…and so do they. You have a need to generate resources that support the creation of those stories…and so do they.

There are practices that corporate content creators have been putting in effect for decades that allow them to distribute their stories and generate a profit while they do it.

This workshop will give you access to an insider’s view of corporate
storytellers. Corporate storytellers such as The Greenville News and local CBS affiliate WSPA have a lot in common with you as a writer: the need to create stories and earn a living in the process.

In my workshop, “Five MORE Things I Learned from Corporate America that Help Your Writing Business Pay for Itself ” we’ll unpack what I learned from corporate America that help your writing business pay for itself.

 

Edie Melson – Love the World You Build

As fiction writers, we are world builders. It doesn’t matter what genre we pursue, we are still creating an imaginary place for readers to hang out and experience our stories. These worlds are limited only by our imagination. But just like in the physical world, there are rules we must follow—a lot of the time we get to make up the rules—but there are still rules.
In my workshop, “Love the World You Build,” I share how to build a consistent world that makes sense for your reader. We’ll discuss the power of language and invented words, research for places that have actually existed and how to make your setting an important character in the story you tell.

 

 

 

Linda Vigen Phillips – Using Verse to Get to the Heart of Your Story

                                       

Writing a verse novel may not be your intention or even your cup of tea, but writing in verse can be good for your writing health.  As writers, we all mine our past, and capturing difficult or sensitive memories in verse is a therapeutic exercise that can lead to strong story elements.  Suffering from writer’s block? Throw rules out the window and jot down whatever comes to mind in a free-verse format. Want to probe deeper into your characters?  Have them write their hearts out in verse. This method is particularly effective in capturing the depth and voice of a protagonist on a spiritual journey.  

In, “Using Verse to Get to the Heart of Your Story,” we will explore a variety of formats that authors have used successfully in their verse novels.  Participants will have the opportunity to turn an emotionally charged memory or idea into free verse, and to use a shape poem to show setting, action, or mood.   

 

Kenzi Nevins – An ILLUSTRATOR’S Market: Portfolio, Platform, and Proposals

 

Imagine walking into a bookstore and seeing a line of stuffed animals above the children’s book section…but these aren’t just any animals, they’re yours! The illustrations from your book, brought to life. What does it take to stand out in today’s increasingly freelance illustration market? What tools does an illustrator need once the drawings are finished to have kids, adults, and EDITORS begging for more? Come to “An Illustrator’s Market: Portfolio, Platform, and Proposals” to find out!

 

                     

Nancy Lohr – The Plot Thickens

 

An idea, an emotion, a hero or heroine (the protagonist) all are necessary elements to include in a novel for children, but none of these are suitable for a strong and compelling plot. My workshop. “The Plot Thickens” will look at a variety of ways to develop a plot that will hold a reader’s attention and deliver a satisfying forward-moving story.

 

 

                                     

                                      Attention Teens

Carol Baldwin – Let Your Characters Do the Heavy Work

 

Try this recipe for story success: Start with a memorable, authentic protagonist. Add a complicated, believable antagonist. Put them into a sensory setting and watch what conflicts ensue.  In this workshop, we’ll complete several writing exercises that will help you deepen your unforgettable, true-to-life characters.

 

                                                     

 

Two Giveaways

 

 

Write2Ignite Team Videographers!

 

When this picture was taken of the Write2Ignite team at the 2018 conference, little did they know that within a year many of them would become “experts” at taking and posting videos online. Here’s a sampling of some of the recent videos our team created about writing and the conference. View one or view them all! As new videographers, we would appreciate your feedback–and of course, we hope to see you at Write2Ignite 2019!

 

Deborah DiCiantis on the Teen/Tween Fiction Contest

Click here for more information on the contest.

Diane Buie talks about how to get the most out of your 15 minute meeting time at a writer’s conference.

Brenda Covert shares the benefit of getting a critique.

Cathy Biggerstaff with “Bring a Friend” discount.

Here’s the link to the Bring a Friend discount. Cathy is given you an EXTRA big discount. Each friend will receive $15.00 off the regular price-which brings your registration down to $109.00. Since we think going to a writer’s conference with a friend is such a good idea, we’re giving this discount throughout the registration period.

Carol Baldwin with 5 Writing Tips.

Celebrate Black History Month

As part of my research for my YA novel Half-Truths, I read a lot of books.  And I mean A LOT. Read my pitch and I think you’ll understand why:

In the heavily segregated South, fifteen-year-old Kate Dinsmore’s world is shaken when she realizes she’s related to her grandmother’s black housemaid. This knowledge leads Kate to truths that threaten to destroy her family.

Early on I realized that to make this story authentic (as one of my 94-year-old African American experts charged me to do), I not only had to speak to people who lived through the time period, but I had to read books.

Here are several which informed my story. I hope some of them will pique your interest so you will read them too. The order in which they are displayed reflects the order in which I read them; most recent book is on top.

Mothers of Massive Resistance: White Women and the Politics of White Supremacy  Written by North Carolina professor, Elizabeth Gillespie McRae, this book opened my eyes to the role that white women in the South played in maintaining segregation.

Memphis, Martin, and the Mountaintop Alice Faye Duncan’s debut picture book told from the perspective of a young girl who “meets” Martin Luther King.

Eyes on the Prize This excellent book on the Civil Rights decade is written by Juan Williams. If you’re looking for an in-depth overview of the Civil Rights movement, then you’ve come to the right book.

Be Free or Die: The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls’ Escape from Slavery to Union Hero. This is a great panoramic view of South Carolina before, during, and after the Civil War and an eye-opening biography of an amazing man.

Crossing Ebenezer Creek This middle grade novel, based on true events, deepened my understanding of what ex-slaves experienced after “freedom.”

Midnight Without a Moon. This book takes place in Mississippi in the mid-50’s. Linda Williams Jackson’s debut novel uses Emmitt Till’s murder as a background for Rose Lee Carter’s decision not to flee the South. 

Loving vs. Virginia. This is a great curriculum resource written in free verse which shows Mildred and Richard Loving’s struggles to legalize their marriage in Virginia. 

The Lions of Little Rock This classic civil rights book is set in Little Rock, AK in 1958. I now use it as a comp title in my pitch for Half-Truths!

Carver: A Life in Poems. Lillian, my most important secondary character, wants to be a scientist. What better person to model her goals after than George Washington Carver?

Primary Lessons: A Memoir by Sarah Bracey White Sarah grew up in the Jim Crow south and here I share excerpts describing her experiences. 

Dear Senator: A Memoir by the Daughter of Strom Thurmond. This book was a fascinating look into Strom Thurmond’s bi-racial daughter and the many challenges she and her mother faced. I blogged about it extensively. 

The Color of Love. This is an autobiographical account of a boy whose mother falls in love with a black man in the Jim Crow South. 

Mixed: My life in Black and White  A candid autobiography written by Angela Nissel. She describes what it was like to grow up in Philadelphia as a bi-racial child during the second half of the 20th century.

Fly Girl  A beautifully written YA novel about a young black woman who becomes a pilot during WWII.

A Lesson Before Dying. A book review of a powerful book portraying racism in Louisiana in the 1940’s.

 

Here are a few of the books that didn’t make it into this list!

Let me know which books you add to your TBR list!

When Carol is not working on Half-Truths or blogging, you’ll find her traveling, trying to improve her golf game, or playing and reading books to one of her six grandchildren. A new member of the Write2Ignite Team, Carol seeks to serve the Lord with the writing gifts He has given her. She has published two non-fiction books and dozens of newspaper and magazine articles and enjoys teaching writing to teens and adults. For more information, please visit her blog where she reviews and gives away gobs of books!

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