Leading up to our YA Master Class on September 18, we published several blogs to help you write young adult books. In case you missed some of them, here they are.

Dealing with hard topics in Christian YA fiction by Ellice Wong

“As Christian writers who aim to influence and encourage young people in their faith, we shouldn’t shy away from tackling difficult or controversial issues relating to identity, destiny and love even in the world of fantasy fiction.” 

Should Writers Be Hopeful About the State of YA Christian Fiction? by Tessa Emily Hall, Master Class Instructor

“Because of the lack of sales in the YA Christian fiction space, the larger CBA houses—Zondervan and Thomas Nelson specifically—have geared their YA titles toward the general market. These titles are not labeled as “Christian,” but many of these books are written by Christians, contain clean content, and may reflect Christian values.” 

Perceive the Trends in the YA Market: Part III by Guest Blogger, Kim Peterson

“In Part I of this series, we’ve explored two trends in writing YA: fantasy and retellings. In Part II, we examined trends that speak to important social and cultural topics. Today, we’re going to focus on three more trends.”

Beautiful- Truth’s Found When Beauty’s Lost: A Book Review by Hadassah and Kelila Murdock

“As sisters ourselves, we (Hadassah and Kelila) especially connected with the sister-dynamic this story displays. We were nervous about reading a young adult novel because many books in this genre tend to be gory or erotic. However, this one proved to be clean and wholesome while still realistic. “

Write2Ignite Recommended YA Books and Series

This list contains recommendations for young adult readers and was composed by Master Class Instructor and award-winning author Tessa Emily Hall and Write2Ignite team members. Please feel free to add your suggestions for Christian  or Clean YA books.

Rumors, Reunions, and Revenge: A New YA Fantasy and Authors Interview

Helena George and Sarah Rodecker‘s third book in their young adult “Pirate Hunter Chronicles” series, Rumors, Reunions and Revenge.

The Button Girl: A YA Christian Fantasy

“What happens when you are raised for sixteen years knowing that the overlords will steal your first two sons and make them into slaves after you button (i.e., marry) your betrothed? 

If your name is Repentance Atwater, that is the dilemma you face as you mature into womanhood. It is the dilemma you answer with all of the integrity you can muster: you will risk the shame that will be brought on your family and your own severe punishment of banishment to the city of the overlords.  You will go against… Providence himself, call him a liar, and say that he has not provided as he ought. (p. 7) You will refuse to button.”

Purple Moon Book Review by Kathryn Dover

A young adult book by our presenter, Tessa Emily Hall, that is full of plot twists and suspense.

Writing Christian Themes in YA Literature by Vijaya Bodach

“At the heart of all fiction is change. You are no longer the person you were at the beginning of the story and in Christian fiction, that change has to reflect a turning toward God or choosing to walk more closely with Him. It might be as simple as a character choosing to walk away from sin at the end, the first step towards transformation. Or it could be a gradual shift from thinking as the world does to thinking how God does. It doesn’t have to be teeming with characters who are going to church or Bible study. But the consequences have to have a Biblical basis. It is a case for moral fiction.”

Writing Clean YA Fantasy by Helena George

“In general, when someone says a book is clean, they mean there aren’t any sex scenes or excessive language in a book. Violence usually is not included in the “cleanliness” factor, especially in fantasy genres, where fights are expected….”

 

Introducing Candice Yamnitz, YA Fantasy Author

“Around Agatha Sea, princesses are poised, magically gifted, and betrothed.

So, when seventeen-year-old Princess Beatriz still fails to secure a betrothal, her parents hold a ball. Forming an alliance could mean the difference between peace and war, but Beatriz doesn’t just want any suitor. She’s in love with her best friend, Prince Lux. Marrying Prince Lux will always be a silly dream as long as she has no magical gift.”

1 comment

What Do You Think?

%d bloggers like this: