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The Finishing Touch

Here’s a sneak peek at conference presenters with descriptions in their own words. We’ll be posting a teaser page each  Monday.

To register, visit: https://write2ignite.com/registration-2019/

 

Vijaya Bodach – Writing a Book that’s Controversial

 

Come to this workshop if you feel called to bring the Light of Christ to problems in this fallen world. What events in recent months have lit a fire under you to do something about them? Go ahead…list them. Pick ONE thing. Now, what can you reasonably expect to do? What can you do with the might of God supporting you? Dream. Write His Dream.

 

 

 

Attention Teens!

Carol Baldwin – Out of This World Fiction & Fantasy

Following up on Daniel Blackaby’s keynote and our previous workshops, we’ll consider important details to empower and invigorate your fantasy and science fiction stories. Consistency and believability are key!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Todd Williams – Connecting With Kids

We were all kids once. Should it really be that hard to relate? Sadly for writers, childhood sometimes seems far away. We will explore some specific characteristics of three age groups between 4 and 11 years old that will remind you of the struggles and joys of being a kid. More than that, we’ll look at creative writing strategies that can target those childhood traits in ways that will excite and energize their minds.

 

 

 

 

 

Jean Matthew Hall – “The Challenges of Writing Fiction Picture Books”

Join us for Jean Matthew Hall’s workshop, “The Challenges of Writing Fiction Picture Books” as we dig into great picture books to search for nine elements that can make your picture books great.

 

 

 

 

Andrea Merrell – Turning Pain Into Prose

Have you ever experienced pain? You know, the gut-wrenching kind that makes you feel as if you’re going under for the third time with no life preserver? Maybe it was a chronic illness, abuse, or a prodigal child. Perhaps it was divorce or even death. Pain affects us all to some degree, but God doesn’t waste a single thing that goes on in our life. He wants us to share our stories to offer hope to those who are hurting. “Turning Pain into Prose “will show you how to dig deeply into those painful experiences to find inspiration, passion, and purpose for your writing.

 

 

Steve Hutson – What NOT to Say to an Agent or Editor

No how matter how good your story, or how awesome your execution, it might not be enough. You still have to sell this thing. Learn what to say — and, very importantly — what NOT to say, when pitching your book.

CONGRATULATIONS to Diane Buie who won an autographed copy of Maiden of Iron: A Steampunk Novel from last week’s giveaway.

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Part II: What Are YOU Looking Forward To?

Last Thursday we shared some of our Write2Ingite staff picks. Here is a sampling of what our attendees are expecting.

Tina Hartig

I’m looking forward to my first Write2Ignite conference. I’ve heard great things about past conferences and know I will pick up some much-needed tips. I also plan to meet friends I’ve made in an on-line writing group for the first time!

Jarm Del Boccio

I am looking forward to perfecting my craft, camaraderie with fellow authors, critiques and connections with publishing industry professionals. All this, hopefully, will lead to more creativity and direction from God as I listen to his still small voice in my life!

Dennis Peterson

Having spent most of my 38 years of writing for publication focused on nonfiction, I am venturing into the world of fiction. At this year’s Write2Ignite conference, I’m eager to learn how to develop and strengthen my plots and create better characters by attending sessions presented by Nancy Lohr and Kim Peterson. I hope to learn better ways to market my efforts from Tony Snipes, who is always an interesting and helpful presenter. I’m also looking forward to hearing keynoter Edie Melson, whose blog I’ve followed for quite some time.

Karen Wallace

I am looking forward to meeting others at Write2Ignite and learning from them how they use their gift of writing to glorify and enjoy God, and to encourage others to do the same. I’m excited to ride over and back with a couple of writers, and the time that gives us to get to know one another better. It is a new wonder for me!

Deborah Allmand

I am looking forward to connecting with writers of faith. Hoping to learn more about how to write for adolescents and teenagers about hope and faith.

Jetta Allen

The Write2Ignite conference has been my annual writing vitamin shot for years. Education and encouragement through its scheduled events and camaraderie in between, fill my cup–but there’s more. Each year I’ve received an unscheduled, tailor-made surprise from God, who knows my heart’s needs. Only He knows what it’ll be this year, but I can’t wait.

Stay tuned for Part III. Next Thursday you’ll hear what our faculty is looking forward to!

 

 

 

 

 

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Finally Friday AND TWO GIVEAWAYS!

Here’s a sneak peek at conference presenters with descriptions in their own words. We’ll be posting a teaser page each  Monday. You still have time to take advantage of the Early Bird Discount.

Visit: https://write2ignite.com/registration-2019/

Tony Snipes – 5 MORE Things I Learned in Corporate America

 

What do you and CBS have in common? You create stories for an audience to consume…and so do they. You try to grow your audience with those stories while staying true to your values…and so do they. You have a need to generate resources that support the creation of those stories…and so do they.

There are practices that corporate content creators have been putting in effect for decades that allow them to distribute their stories and generate a profit while they do it.

This workshop will give you access to an insider’s view of corporate
storytellers. Corporate storytellers such as The Greenville News and local CBS affiliate WSPA have a lot in common with you as a writer: the need to create stories and earn a living in the process.

In my workshop, “Five MORE Things I Learned from Corporate America that Help Your Writing Business Pay for Itself ” we’ll unpack what I learned from corporate America that help your writing business pay for itself.

 

Edie Melson – Love the World You Build

As fiction writers, we are world builders. It doesn’t matter what genre we pursue, we are still creating an imaginary place for readers to hang out and experience our stories. These worlds are limited only by our imagination. But just like in the physical world, there are rules we must follow—a lot of the time we get to make up the rules—but there are still rules.
In my workshop, “Love the World You Build,” I share how to build a consistent world that makes sense for your reader. We’ll discuss the power of language and invented words, research for places that have actually existed and how to make your setting an important character in the story you tell.

 

 

 

Linda Vigen Phillips – Using Verse to Get to the Heart of Your Story

                                       

Writing a verse novel may not be your intention or even your cup of tea, but writing in verse can be good for your writing health.  As writers, we all mine our past, and capturing difficult or sensitive memories in verse is a therapeutic exercise that can lead to strong story elements.  Suffering from writer’s block? Throw rules out the window and jot down whatever comes to mind in a free-verse format. Want to probe deeper into your characters?  Have them write their hearts out in verse. This method is particularly effective in capturing the depth and voice of a protagonist on a spiritual journey.  

In, “Using Verse to Get to the Heart of Your Story,” we will explore a variety of formats that authors have used successfully in their verse novels.  Participants will have the opportunity to turn an emotionally charged memory or idea into free verse, and to use a shape poem to show setting, action, or mood.   

 

Kenzi Nevins – An ILLUSTRATOR’S Market: Portfolio, Platform, and Proposals

 

Imagine walking into a bookstore and seeing a line of stuffed animals above the children’s book section…but these aren’t just any animals, they’re yours! The illustrations from your book, brought to life. What does it take to stand out in today’s increasingly freelance illustration market? What tools does an illustrator need once the drawings are finished to have kids, adults, and EDITORS begging for more? Come to “An Illustrator’s Market: Portfolio, Platform, and Proposals” to find out!

 

                     

Nancy Lohr – The Plot Thickens

 

An idea, an emotion, a hero or heroine (the protagonist) all are necessary elements to include in a novel for children, but none of these are suitable for a strong and compelling plot. My workshop. “The Plot Thickens” will look at a variety of ways to develop a plot that will hold a reader’s attention and deliver a satisfying forward-moving story.

 

 

                                     

                                      Attention Teens

Carol Baldwin – Let Your Characters Do the Heavy Work

 

Try this recipe for story success: Start with a memorable, authentic protagonist. Add a complicated, believable antagonist. Put them into a sensory setting and watch what conflicts ensue.  In this workshop, we’ll complete several writing exercises that will help you deepen your unforgettable, true-to-life characters.

 

                                                     

 

Two Giveaways

 

 

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Wallowing or Ministering?

The party was in full swing. I had arrived early and was determined to be the last to leave. That wouldn’t be difficult, since I was the only person there.

I can party with the best of them. And I’m especially adept at hosting and attending my own pity parties. It’s easy to feel sorry for myself, especially when I’ve been wronged or falsely accused. My natural inclination is to be defensive or sulk at the injustice of my circumstances, all the while wallowing in self-pity. Either way, the party’s on.

The writing life is also not exempt from pity parties. Disappointment over not meeting with the editor we requested at a conference. Discouragement over not getting an agent or a book contract. Doubting opportunities will arise since they haven’t yet.

Then I think of Joseph. If anyone had a right to a pity-party, it was Joseph. First, his brothers sold him as a slave. Then his new master falsely accused him of sexual misconduct and threw him into a foreign prison. Joseph had no clue as to how long he’d be there—perhaps until his death. But instead of wallowing in self-pity, he worked as a trustworthy representative of the prison keeper.

Even more surprising, Joseph looked past the injustice of his own situation to help someone else (Genesis 40:6-7). He noticed the dejection of his fellow prisoners and inquired about their situation. Joseph didn’t realize it at the time, but in assisting his fellow prisoners he was preparing the way for the fulfillment of God’s plan for his own release.

Joseph is a powerful example to me—a reminder to look beyond my own disappointments so God can use me to minister to others.

So as you prepare for conference season, are you willing to see beyond your own disappointments? Will you look for someone else who needs encouragement? Will you trust God’s timing in the face of doubt and discouragement? Consider asking fellow conferees about their writing journey. You might even find a new accountability or critique partner!

When we put others’ needs ahead of our own, God works miraculously in our life…and then through our life to touch the lives of others. And who knows? Perhaps someday God will use the person you encouraged to encourage you!

Are you wallowing or ministering?

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Life After a Writers’ Conference

How can I capture in words what last year’s Write2Ignite conference meant to me? Attending my first-ever writers’ conference left me feeling (and probably looking) like a deer in headlights! I left with an overwhelming conviction of the need for Christian writers and with a vast amount of information gleaned from each workshop. God lit a fire in me to pursue writing as I never had before.

At Write2Ignite, I had a conversation with Brenda Covert about poetry and Union Gospel Press. That conversation led me to apply to write for Union Gospel Press after the conference. Months passed, and I received an acceptance to write for the press’s Sunday school curriculum. What a small but positive step in the large world of writing and publishing!

Another opportunity opened when I created a writers’ club with friends at my church. This August, our team will celebrate its first-year anniversary as Women of the Word: Overcomers Writing Group.

You know, I still have my folder of notes from last year’s conference; and every now and then, I glance through the pages of inspiration that first ignited a drive in me to truly go for it! The 2017 conference still speaks life into my writing.

I think it’s safe to say that God will surely amaze us with all He wants to accomplish in the many creative people He’ll bring to this year’s conference. I hope to meet you there so we can see what God does!

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Want to know more about Diane and her writing? Connect with her on Facebook.

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What Can I Expect to Gain at Write2Ignite?

A beginning writer’s wish list before attending a writer’s conference:

  • An editor will fall in love with my manuscript and give me a contract on the spot.
  • Lots of other writers will read my manuscripts and polish them so they shine.
  • Many editors will recognize my genius as a writer and beg me for more stories.

If only it were that simple, right? Every writer would love those results! It’s wise to have realistic expectations when attending a writing conference. Although occasionally an author is blessed with a contract on the spot at a writing conference, more realistically an author may go home with some valuable insights for improving her manuscripts and knowledge about a few appropriate places to submit them.

So what are some realistic expectations for authors—or illustrators—attending a Write2Ignite conference?

Publisher and author Cheri Cowell

Encouragement

Beginning and experienced Christian authors and illustrators (as well as editors and agents) want to see you succeed. As you attend workshops and listen to keynote speakers, you’ll hear many share the experiences they had as they found their way into the publishing world. You’ll have opportunities to sign up for interviews with editors and agents, where you can discuss your manuscripts. And even if an editor or agent doesn’t fall in love with one of your manuscripts, that person may share some nuggets of wisdom that can get you a contract down the road—if you listen and apply what you hear.

Networking

You’ll be sitting elbow to elbow with other serious writers who may be interested in joining a critique group with you. You may learn of a new publishing house through an author who was recently published. You might learn from another author’s mishaps as you chat across the lunch table, and you can avoid making the same mistakes. You’ll certainly find a team of encouragers whom you can keep up with throughout the year. And you may also discover that rejection slips are not the end of the world—in fact, successful authors have received piles of them on their way to success.

Learning

There will be workshops on a great many topics. Some will help you understand the thought processes of an editor. Others will challenge you to create better story ideas, while others are there to help you break into writing for magazines. Learning how to get a manuscript ready for submission is also addressed, along with getting publicity for your work, once it’s published.

Writing for Children, Teens, and Young Adults

Write2Ignite Conference is unique in that it’s primarily focused on writing for youth—from infants to young adults. Contrary to what’s commonly thought by many readers, writing for children is the most difficult kind of writing there is. At Write2Ignite, we focus on what it takes to reach young readers with God’s message without becoming preachy or boring them with dull writing.

The Teen Track

Not only do we focus on writing for children and teens but we also have a special Teen Track, where tweens and teens (middle school and high school students) can come to learn. The Teen Track has been a very popular feature of Write2Ignite Conference for several years. Teens have their own lively speakers and workshops as well as other workshop choices. In addition to special teen-only sessions, they join adults for keynote addresses.